BES Secretary elected to the AEU Executive Board

Baltimore Ethical Society (BES) is delighted to announce the election of Dr. Khandra Sears, BES secretary, to the board of the American Ethical Union. She will serve a one-year term in both organizations.

CONTINUE READING

New President Leads BES on Inclusive Path

Dr. Omowale Elson, the newly elected BES President, will be seeking to guide the organization through its strategic goals of being a more inclusive and antiracist organization and to be more engaging with its membership and the Baltimore region.

CONTINUE READING

Volunteer Appreciation Picnic

On Saturday, April 17, 2022, 20 BES members and guests attended the Volunteer Appreciation Picnic at Lake Roland Park. A splendid time was had by all.

CONTINUE READING

December 2020 Blog – On “The Voices of Black Women”

As we prepare to welcome the first Black woman VP vice president, expectations will be extremely high for Kamala Harris. Although she is praised by author Bettina Love for talking truth to power – like when she challenged Joe Biden on his bussing record – Love predicts Harris will not have a “honeymoon period” simply […]

CONTINUE READING

November 2020 Blog – On “Voting”

In 1972 John Lewis co-authored a Notre Dame Law Review article documenting how, “[t]he history of black political participation in the United States has been one of struggle – pitting blacks against those forces which would continue to enslave and exploit minority groups.” It told how in 1876 more than 700,000 Black citizens registered to vote, only to […]

CONTINUE READING

October 2020 Blog – On “Double Standards for Black Women”

Democratic VP nominee Kamala Harris deals simultaneously with both racism and sexism. Hillary Clinton, who faced misogyny campaigning for the presidency, warned Harris to “be prepared…to have the most horrible things said about you.’’ When Barack Obama ascended to the presidency, some declared that America had become “post-racial,” yet our first Black president was contantly attacked […]

CONTINUE READING

September 2020 Blog – On “The Talk”

Most parents are challenged by having to have “the talk” with their teenagers.  For many parents of Black children, however, “the talk” is not about the wonders, dangers, and responsibilities of sexuality.  It’s about staying alive when interacting with police. Thirty years ago, Peggy McIntosh taught me how I avoided having to have such conversations with my […]

CONTINUE READING

August 2020 Blog – On “Embodied Trauma”

New studies in epigenetics strongly support what Black Americans already know: white supremacy is passed down generation after generation. They inform Resmaa Menakem’s book,  My Grandmother’s Hands: Racialized Trauma and the Pathway to Mending Our Hearts and Bodies.  Menakem was struck by the embodied nature of racism, realizing that picking cotton beginning at the age of four left his grandmother with “thick, […]

CONTINUE READING

July 2020 Blog – On “Patriotism”

Almost four years ago Colin Kaepernick took a knee to protest the blatent police killing of Black people. Retired Army Green Beret Nate Boyer, someone who most Americans would call a patriot, suggested to the 49er quarterback that kneeling was respectful.  But many attacked Kaepernick as unpatriotic, and for that his career was derailed. Kaepernick insisted, “I’m not […]

CONTINUE READING

June 2020 Blog – On “Police Force”

How can we make sense of the last words spoken by George Floyd? With a law enforcement office kneeling on his neck for eight minutes and other officers looking on, Floyd pleaded, “please, please, please I can’t breathe, please man, please somebody…I can’t move, mama, mama, I can’t, my knee, my nuts, I’m through, I’m through, I’m […]

CONTINUE READING
Change this in Theme Options
Change this in Theme Options