“Privacy in the Digital Age”

Privacy is gravely endangered in the digital age – and we, the spied upon, collude in the effort. What does the plight of privacy mean for democracy? Political theorists have argued it is essential for liberty and autonomy. It turns out, however, that privacy is a relatively new virtue, and enjoyed by few. What’s more, privacy has not been common currency among notable political movements. The public sphere may be of greater significance and import to our freedom. Unfortunately, however, the public realm is equally endangered by digital technology.

Firmin DeBrabander is a professor of Philosophy at the Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore. He received his Ph. D. from Emory University, and his MA from the Catholic University of Louvain in Belgium. He has written for a variety of national publications, including the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Baltimore Sun, the Atlantic and the New Republic. He is the author of three books, most recently, Life After Privacy, published by Cambridge University Press in 2020.

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